Home    |    Today: 1/Sep/2014
 
Print this Page
Tell a friend
Text Size:  A A A
Search Resource Advanced Search Most Popular   |   Top Rated   |   What's New
Resource Directory
Siteforum
Sitenews
Weblinks
Events
Help Desk
 


Dear Readers,
Ocular Prosthesis is an artificial eye, fitted to patients whose eye has been removed and for those with blind contracted (pthysical) eye. During enucleation (the surgical process of removing the eye), a ball implant is inserted into the eye socket, to fill the area the eye once occupied. An ocular prosthesis is then moulded to fit in front of the implant. It occupies the space between the eyelids and the skin (conjunctiva) covering the implant. This issue of Site News explores the Introduction and History of Prosthesis, Care, Types, and Case Reports of Prosthesis. It also brings to you Prosthesis Rehabilitation, Replacement, Management, Color stability, Custom Ocular Prosthesis and Research & Materials.

Your feedback will help us improve the newsletter. Please send in your feedback at eyesite@aravind.orgThank You. Have a happy reading.

Regards,
Library Team
The Issue Features...
Ocular Prosthesis
Vol.11 No.2 March & April 2014
•Introduction
•Ocular Prosthesis
•History of prosthesis
•Care of ocular prosthesis
•Types of Ocular Prosthesis
•Ocular Prosthesis and Case Reports
•Prosthetic Replacement
•Management of Prosthesis
•Color Stability
•Custom Ocular Prosthesis
•Research & Materials

• Past Issues




Goto
TOP


  • An ocular prosthesis or artificial eye is a type of craniofacial prosthesis that replaces an absent natural eye following an enucleation, evisceration, or orbital exenteration. The prosthesis fits over an orbital implant and under the eyelids. Often referred to as a glass eye, the ocular prosthesis roughly takes the shape of a convex shell and is made of medical grade plastic acrylic. A few ocular prostheses today are made of cryolite glass. A variant of the ocular prosthesis is a very thin hard shell known as a scleral shell which can be worn over a damaged or eviscerated eye. Makers of ocular prosthetics are known as ocularists. An ocular prosthesis does not provide vision; this would be a visual prosthesis. Someone with an ocular prosthesis is totally blind on the affected side and has monocular (one sided) vision.

  • FABRICATION OF CUSTOM OCULAR PROSTHESIS USING A GRAPH GRID

  • The present article is an illustration of a case report of a lady chosen for a custom ocular prosthesis. The method described here uses a transparent grid template from which the iris is traced. An attempt is also made to mimick the shade and colour of the sclera in the wax pattern itself, using white paraffin wax. This gives an accurate registration of the position and alignment of iris disc assembly, giving a natural look.




Goto
TOP

  • THE ART OF OCULAR PROSTHETICS

  • The ocular prosthetics clinic at Moorfields Eye Hospital is the largest in-house facility of its type in the UK and it is expanding further, revealed chief ocularist David Carpenter when speaking to OTabout the department and its work.The ocular prosthetics clinic at Moorfields Eye Hospital is the largest in-house facility of its type in the UK and it is expanding further, revealed chief ocularist David Carpenter when speaking to OTabout the department and its work.

  • OCULAR PROSTHESIS

  • This article describes the various aspects of ocular prosthesis including fabrication, fitting andapects of ocular prosthesis including fabrication, fitting and maintenance.

  • ORBITAL IMPLANTS AND OCULAR PROSTHESES: A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW

  • The loss of an eye can be a very traumatic event in a person’s life, not only medically, but also emotionally. F or many, the face and eyes help represent who they are, and it is common for these patients to feel as if a part of them has been lost. It is the responsibility of ophthalmologists and eye care providers, as they journey with patients through the process of eye removal and artificial eye placement, to provide the best possible functional and cosmetic results.




Goto
TOP

  • A BRIEF HISTORY OF OCULAR PROSTHESES

  • The art of making artificial eyes has been practiced since ancient times. Egyptian priests made the first ocular prostheses, called Ectblepharons, as early as the fifth century BC. In those days, artificial eyes were made of enameled metal or painted clay and attached to cloth and worn outside the socket.

  • THE HISTORY OF ARTIFICIAL EYES

  • The first evidence of human’s wearing an artificial eye was recently uncovered in the southeastern part of Iran. The woman, carbon-dated back to 2900 BCE, was discovered wearing a rudimentary ocular prosthesis worn outside of the eye socket. This crude, hemispherical form was made of clay and covered with a thin layer of gold. Tiny holes were also drilled into both sides of the eye, through which gold thread passed to hold the eyeball in place.

  • A BRIEF HISTORY OF OCULAR PROSTHESIS

  • Artificial eye-making has been practiced since ancient times. The first ocular prostheses were made by Roman and Egyptian priests as early as the fifth century BC. In those days artificial eyes were made of painted clay attached to cloth and worn outside the socket.




Goto
TOP




Goto
TOP

  • OCULAR PROSTHETICS

  • This article focuses history and types of ocular prosthetics.

  • EVALUATION OF OCULAR PROSTHESIS

  • It has been commonly observed that ocular prosthesis generally fitted do not conform to. In the present communication we have tried to evaluate the various types of ocular prosthesis fitted by us.




Goto
TOP




Goto
TOP




Goto
TOP

  • MANAGEMENT OF AN EYE PROSTHESIS OR CONFORMER



  • HOW TO HANDLE YOUR ARTIFICIAL EYES

  • If you recently got fake eyes, one of your major questions on your mind is how to take care of your artificial eyes and the best way to handle and clean them. The good news is that ocular prosthetics can easily be removed and replaced with some practice. They are held in place by the lower and upper eyelids and fit to the interior of the eye socket. Most patients wear their prosthesis full time, removing only occasionally to clean, while other patients remove their prosthesis at night. Wearing full time is ideal.




Goto
TOP

  • EVALUATION OF IRIS COLOR STABILITY IN OCULAR PROSTHESIS

  • This study evaluated the stability of acrylic paints used for replicating iris color in ocular prostheses by the analysis of two factors: the temperature of the acrylic resin polymerization cycle during prosthesis fabrication and the incidence of sun light, which is the main photodegrading agent undermining the longevity of ocular prostheses. An accelerated aging assay was used for both analyses.

  • COLOR ALTERATION OF THE PAINT USED FOR IRIS PAINTING IN OCULAR PROSTHESES

  • The purpose of this study was to assess color alteration of the paints used for iris painting in artificial eyes. Five disks of heat cured acrylic resin were confectioned by microwave energy for each paintanalyzed, in a total of 40 specimens.

  • INFLUENCE OF ARTIFICIAL ACCELERATED AGEING ON THE COLOUR STABILITY OF PAINTS USED FOR OCULAR PROSTHESIS IRIS PAINTING

  • To evaluate the colour stability of paints used for ocular prosthesis iris painting submitted for accelerated artificial ageing (AAA).

  • DIGITAL IMAGING IN THE FABRICATION OF OCULAR PROSTHESES

  • Several ocular and orbital disorders require surgical intervention that may result in ocular defects. Theassociated psychological effect of these defects on the patient requires immediate management and rehabilitation intervention by a team of specialists. The role of the maxillofacial prosthodontist in fabricatingan ocular prosthesis with acceptable esthetics to restore facial symmetry and normal appearance for theanophthalmic patient becomes essential. This article presents a technique for fabricating ocular prosthesesusing the advantages of digital photography.

  • IMPRESSIONS TECHNIQUES FOR OCULAR PROSTHESIS - A CLINICAL REVIEW

  • Ocular prosthesis modification, and the wax Scleral blank technique. The aim of the article is to review the literature on different Clinical impressions techniques used for the fabrication of an ocular prosthesis.




Goto
TOP

  • REPRODUCTION OF CUSTOM MADE EYE PROSTHESIS



  • ASSISTANCE IN DEVELOPING A CUSTOM-MADE PROSTHETIC EYE SERVICE

  • A small percentage of patients will not tolerate the fitting of a scleral shell prosthesis, due to underlying symptoms causing the phthisical eye to be sensitive and painful. However, this sensitivity can be caused from mechanicalentropion, the eyelids being unsupported by the reduction of eye volume and the eyelashes rotating inwards.

  • A TIME SAVING METHOD TO FABRICATE A CUSTOM OCULAR PROSTHESIS

  • In this article somealternate procedures have been presented to save time whilefabrication of a custom ocular prosthesis. Digital photographywas used to replicate the iris of the patient, replacing theconventional oil paint technique. Advantages, such as reducedtreatment time and increased simplicity make this method analternative for fabricating ocular prostheses.




Goto
TOP

  • FACTORS AFFECTING ARTIFICIAL EYE WEAR

  • Keith Pine commenced his MSc programme with the Department of Optometry and Vision Science in March 2009 and has conducted two pieces of experimental work with private patients under University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee approval. The first experiment was a survey of patients to identify concerns that artificial eye wearers had. The results of this first part of the project (paper submitted to the journal “Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology” on 31st March 2010) identified that the health of their remaining eye was the major concern. The second most important concern was the watering, crusting and discharge associated with wearing their prosthesis. In the second experiment age, hand washing, removal and cleaning regimes, shape and weight of the prosthesis and deposit formation were investigated having the potential to affect artificial eye wear. The results from this experiment are currently being analysed. http://www.artificialeyes.

  • MATERIAL FOR OCULAR PROSTHETICS

  • An optical prosthetic device made from a material based on silicone compounds is a cured composition resulting from vulcanization of a mixture of a,bis-trivinylsiloxyoligodimethyl(methylphenyl)-siloxane and bis-trimethyl(dimethylhydro)siloxyoligomethyl(phenyl)methylhydro-siloxane in the presence of a polyaddition reaction catalyst based on the compounds of metals of the platinum group, the ratio of the first mixture component to the second one ranging within 100:1 and 100:20 parts by mass.

  • OCULAR PROSTHETIC CENTRE



  • INTERNATIONAL PROSTHETIC EYE CENTER






Goto
Top

You can also refer your friends to register with the innovative resources. Send in your friend's e-mail id to us at eyesite@aravind.org with the subject line Register my friend's id!

Subscribe Sitenews

If you want to unsubscribe from our mailing list and from all our communications please click on the following link:
Unsubscribe Sitenews

Address:

Vision 2020 e-resource team,
Lions Aravind Institute of Community Ophthalmology,
1, Annanagar, Madurai - 625 020,
Tamil Nadu, India,
E-mail:eyesite@aravind.org
Phone: 91-452-2537580
  1. April & May 2013 2013 -Cataract Surgical Monitoring
  2. March 2013 2013 -Sterilization
  3. January & February 2014 2014 -Optical Dispensing
  4. January & February 2013 2013 -Instruments and Maintenance
  5. March & April 2014 2014 -Ocular Prosthesis
  6. May & June 2012 2012 -Research in Eye Care
  7. November & December 2012 2012 -IT Applications in Eye Care
  8. August 2012 2012 -Primary Eye Care
  9. July 2012 2012 -Refractive Error
  10. Jan & Feb 2012 - Human Resoure in Eye Care
  11. Oct 2011-SUSTAINABILITY IN EYE CARE
  12. Sep 2011-REACHING THE UNREACHED EYE CARE SERVICES
  13. Feb 2011-HEALTH INSURANCE
  14. Jan 2011-PATIENT SAFETY
  15. Oct 2010-COMMUNITY OPHTHALMOLOGY
  16. Aug 2010-DIABETIC RETINOPATHY
  17. Jul 2010-GLAUCOMA SCREENING
  18. Jun 2010-TYPES OF CATARACT
  19. May 2010-STRABISMUS
  20. Apr 2010-EYECARE FOR BABIES
  21. Mar 2010-CONGENITAL CATARACT
  22. Feb 2010-EYE CARE STATUS – WHO REGIONS
  23. Jan 2010-EYE CARE STATUS – WHO REGIONS
  24. Dec 2009-ENHANCING COMPLIANCE TO TREATMENT
  25. Nov 2009-DIABETES AND EYE
  26. Oct 2009-COST OF EYE CARE
  27. Sep 2009-GENDER and EYE HEALTH
  28. Aug 2009-Vision Rehabilitation
  29. Jul 2009-Patient Empowerment
  30. Jun 2009-Service Marketing
  31. May 2009-Medical Tourism
  32. Apr 2009-Pharmacy Management
  33. Mar 2009-Hospital accreditation
  34. Feb 2009-Hospital accreditation
  35. Jan 2009-Monitoring In Eye Care
  36. Dec 2008-Monitoring In Eye Care
  37. Nov 2008-Inpatient Management In Eye Care
  38. Oct 2008-Advocacy in Eye Care
  39. Sep 2008-Macular Degeneration
  40. Aug 2008-Amblyopia
  41. Jul 2008-Computer Vision Syndrome
  42. Jun 2008-Creating Awareness about Eye Care
  43. May 2008-Resource Utilization
  44. Apr 2008-Eye Care Barriers
  45. Mar 2008-Global Eye Care Programme
  46. Feb 2008-Standardization through Clinical Protocols
  47. Jan 2008-Materials Management in Hospitals
  48. Dec 2007-Glaucoma Management
  49. Nov 2007-Outpatient Management
  50. Oct 2007-Demand Generation
  51. Sep 2007-Trachoma
  52. Aug 2007-Eye Banking
  53. Jul 2007-Diabetic Retinopathy
  54. Jun 2007-Paediatric Eye Care Services
  55. May 2007-Managing People
  56. Apr 2007-Ophthalmic Emergencies in Eye Care
  57. Mar 2007-Eye Care Information Resource Center
  58. Feb 2007-Patient Education Resources
  59. Jan 2007-Financial Planning for Eye Hospital
  60. Dec 2006-Patient Satisfaction
  61. Nov 2006-MLOP for Effective Delivery of Eye Care
  62. Oct 2006-Low Vision & Refractive Error
  63. Sep 2006-Tele Ophthalmology
  64. Aug 2006-Medical Records in Hospitals
  65. Jul 2006-Housekeeping in Hospitals
  66. Jun 2006-Quality Assurance in Eye Care
  67. May 2006-Refractive Correction
  68. Apr 2006-Evidence for Action - Cataract Control
  69. Mar 2006-Leadership
  70. Feb 2006-Community Outreach - Cataract
  71. Jan 2006-Counselling
  72. Dec 2005-Vision Centre
  73. Nov 2005-Human Resources in Eye Care
  74. Oct 2005-Ophthalmic Equipment and Instruments
  75. Sep 2005-IEC
  76. Aug 2005-Start up eye Hospital
  77. Jul 2005-Refractive Error
  78. Jun 2005-Low Vision
  79. May 2005-Cataract
  80. Apr 2005-Paediatric Eye Care Service Delivery
  81. Mar 2005-Strategic Planning Tools
  82. Feb 2005-Frequently Asked Questions on Eye Glasses!
  83. Jan 2005-Refractive Error Service Resources
  84. Dec 2004-Highlighting Starting a New Eye Hospital Tool
  85. Nov 2004-Diabetic Retinopathy Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Study
  86. Oct 2004-Strategy worksheet for continually improving quality of services and checklist
  87. Sep 2004-Quality Cataract Series - Paramedical Contributions Module
  88. Aug 2004-Sterilization Protocol
  89. Jul 2004-Medical Records Protocol
  90. Jun 2004-Magnitude of Cataract Blindness Estimation Tool
  91. May 2004-Cataract Frequently Asked Questions
  92. Apr 2004-Introduction to SiteNews
About Us   |   Subscribe to Sitenews   |   Contact Us   |   Sitemap
© Copyright to VISION 2020 e-resource. Developed and maintained by Aravind Communications